1. Hurricane Irene may have triggered Virginia earthquake aftershocks 
You probably remember the 5.8 magnitude earthquake that shook much of the eastern United states August 23, 2011. 
You may also remember that a few days later, powerful Hurricane Irene also moved up the east coast.
Scientists now believe that Hurricane Irene may have triggered some of the earthquake’s aftershocks.
The findings were presented as scientists met at the annual meeting of the Seismological Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Researchers say the rate of aftershocks normally decrease with time. However, after Hurricane Irene, the amount of aftershocks increased dramatically. Using more sensitive measurements, they found 10 times more aftershocks than had previously been detected. 
VIRGINIA TECH SEISMOLOGIST SAYS NOT SO FAST
According to the Nature.com article, Martin Chapman, a seismologist at Virginia Tech says it’s too early to pinpoint weather as the cause of the 2011 Virginia earthquake’s aftershocks.
Chapman says there are many other factors, such as the moon’s gravitational pull and tidal forces that may have impacted the increased amount of aftershocks.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE & STUDY AT NATURE.COM

    Hurricane Irene may have triggered Virginia earthquake aftershocks 

    You probably remember the 5.8 magnitude earthquake that shook much of the eastern United states August 23, 2011. 

    You may also remember that a few days later, powerful Hurricane Irene also moved up the east coast.

    Scientists now believe that Hurricane Irene may have triggered some of the earthquake’s aftershocks.

    The findings were presented as scientists met at the annual meeting of the Seismological Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Researchers say the rate of aftershocks normally decrease with time. However, after Hurricane Irene, the amount of aftershocks increased dramatically. Using more sensitive measurements, they found 10 times more aftershocks than had previously been detected. 

    VIRGINIA TECH SEISMOLOGIST SAYS NOT SO FAST

    According to the Nature.com article, Martin Chapman, a seismologist at Virginia Tech says it’s too early to pinpoint weather as the cause of the 2011 Virginia earthquake’s aftershocks.

    Chapman says there are many other factors, such as the moon’s gravitational pull and tidal forces that may have impacted the increased amount of aftershocks.

    READ THE FULL ARTICLE & STUDY AT NATURE.COM

    1. brentwatts posted this

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