1. Here’s what a thunderstorm looks like from 60 miles away. Storm chaser Chris White shared this video he took of the storm near Danville Thursday evening. 

    If it were darker, storms like this are what people often thing is “heat lightning.” There’s actually no such thing. “Heat lightning” is simply the lightning strikes from a storm that could be nearly 50-100 miles away.

  2. Perfectly good explanation why it was snowing over Galax today. OK. It truly wasn’t snowing, but if you looked at a few of the radar products out there on the market it sure looked like it.
Take a look at this funny tweet from an observant viewer Mark C. then I’ll explain.

Something tells me there isn’t frozen precip in Carroll/Grayson/Wythe #SWVAWX pic.twitter.com/X3VMx9QhgA
— Mark C. (@marksregard) June 2, 2013
Many of the mobile and online radar products on the market use temperature data to help derive the type of precipitation that may be falling outside. But what happens if the temperature is blatantly wrong? You get today’s scenario. There are thousands of reporting stations across the globe. WeatherBug is one of those. It also uses the data from some of those stations to help make better, hyperlocal forecasts.
However, when the reporting station in Galax at the AEP Byllesby/Buch Hydro Plant went crazy, the radar that used that data to help determine precipitation type, thought it should have been snowing. It wasn’t.
Just wanted to show you how one little piece of weather data can make or break a forecast or even a radar product.

    Perfectly good explanation why it was snowing over Galax today.
    OK. It truly wasn’t snowing, but if you looked at a few of the radar products out there on the market it sure looked like it.

    Take a look at this funny tweet from an observant viewer Mark C. then I’ll explain.


    Many of the mobile and online radar products on the market use temperature data to help derive the type of precipitation that may be falling outside. But what happens if the temperature is blatantly wrong? You get today’s scenario. There are thousands of reporting stations across the globe. WeatherBug is one of those. It also uses the data from some of those stations to help make better, hyperlocal forecasts.

    However, when the reporting station in Galax at the AEP Byllesby/Buch Hydro Plant went crazy, the radar that used that data to help determine precipitation type, thought it should have been snowing. It wasn’t.

    Just wanted to show you how one little piece of weather data can make or break a forecast or even a radar product.

  3. Roanoke man captures “snow roller” on camera 

    Izak Veldsman send me these photos (above) of what looks like a snow burrito. Turns out, these are a rare meteorological phenomenon that occurs when chunks of snow/sleet are blown along the ground (or in this case, the wind blowing over the car), causing it to roll into a ball. This is much the way you’d take a snowball and roll it on the ground to make a snowman.

    What happened in this case is the snow/sleet got icy, at the same time the high winds came through Wednesday night. The wind kept blowing the snow/sleet over on itself until it formed these snow rollers. 

    Here’s a link to more snow rollers and below is Izak’s original email to me. I love your photos and stories. Keep sending them in. "LIKE" me on Facebook!

    __________________
    My car was parked in the driveway during Wednesday night, and when I got to my car this morning I found this interesting roll of ice/snow on the windscreen, on top of the windscreen wipers.
     
    It looked complete like a rolled up newspaper. Do you have any idea how this was formed?
     
    Regards,
    Izak Veldsman
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